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Friday, 17 August 2012

WRITE & LISTEN


Do you want to know how to pronounce something perfectly well? 

Click HERE and type a text in the box. Click 'SAY IT' and listen to it! You can even choose different voices and accents.

Enjoy it!


HOW THE MONA LISA GOT HER SMILE




Click HERE and listen to the story of Mona Lisa. You couldn't possibly find more weird facts!!


Click HERE and read this article of ScienceNetLinks. You can also listen to it while reading the transcript. There is a questionnaire at the bottom of the article. Copy the questions and answer them to hand in!



LEARNING VOCABULARY

Check out this great dictionary to learn and practise vocabulary. Just choose the topic, listen to the words and play the games to memorize them!

  
Click HERE to work with the dictionary


ANIMAL FLIP BOOK


Go through the pages of this book and check how much you know about animals:



CLICK HERE TO SEE THE BOOK



PASSIVE VOICE

WHAT IS PASSIVE VOICE?


English has two voices: active and passive

The active voice is used when the subject does the action of the sentence. E.G. The dog ate my homework. 
 
The passive voice is used when the subject does not do the action of the sentence. E.G. My homework was eaten by the dog. 

We can only form a passive sentence from an active sentence when there is an object in the active sentence (transitive verbs).
 
The passive is formed with any verbal tense of the verb TO BE + the  PAST PARTICIPLE


WHEN IS PASSIVE VOICE USED?

1.  When the agent of the action is unknown:
E.G. My wallet was stolen last night. (we don't know who stole the wallet)

2.  When the agent is unimportant:
The new students’ centre was completed last week. (the people who built the centre are unnecessary information for the meaning of the sentence)

3. When the agent of the action is obvious from the context:
I was born in March of '55. (Everyone knows that it was my mother bore me then)

4.  To emphasize (put importance on) the recipient (receiver) of the action:
a. Only Jane was injured in the accident; the remainder of the passengers were unhurt. (we want Jane to be the subject of the sentence and at the beginning to emphasize her importance)
b. Erina was chosen as best student, and of course this made her happy. (the teacher who chose Erina is not what we want to emphasize)

5. To connect ideas in different clauses more clearly:
a. Pharmacologists would like to study the natural ‘pharmacy’ known as the rainforest, if this can be done before clear-cutting destroys it. (in this sentence, keeping THIS near the first clause makes the sentence's meaning clearer)
b. The music was being played too loud by the students, who were finally asked to turn it down.

6.  To make generic statements, announcements, and explanations:
a. Something should be done about the traffic jams in this town.
b. Patrons are asked not to smoke.
c. It's said that it's going to rain tonight.(Often, people will say, 'They say that it's going to rain tonight', the they being the weatherman.)

HOW DO WE FORM PASSIVE VOICE?

The passive form is created by combining a form of the VERB TO BE with the PAST PARTICIPLE of the main verb. 

In the passive voice the object of the active sentence becomes subject in the passive sentence. The subject of the active sentence becomes the agent of the passive sentence or is left out.
In fact, the agent of the passive sentence is not mostly written: we are not normally interested in the doer of the action in the passive sentence or the doer is unimportant or obvious. When we need to mention the doer of the action, we use the preposition BY.
example:

Active: Peter a house.
Passiv
Passive: A house is built by Peter.


The passive can be used in different verbal tenses. Let's take a look at the passive forms of the verb write.

Tense Subject Verb Object
Simple Present Active: Ritawrites a letter.
Passive: A letteris writtenby Rita.
Simple Past Active: Ritawrotea letter.
Passive: A letterwas writtenby Rita.
Present Perfect Active: Ritahas writtena letter.
Passive: A letterhas been writtenby Rita.
Future Active: Ritawill writea letter.
Passive: A letterwill be writtenby Rita.
Modals Active: Ritacan writea letter.
Passive: A lettercan be writtenby Rita.

Tense Subject Verb Object
Present Continuous Active: Ritais writinga letter.
Passive: A letteris being writtenby Rita.
Past Continuous Active: Ritawas writinga letter.
Passive: A letterwas being writtenby Rita.
Past Perfect Active: Ritahad writtena letter.
Passive: A letterhad been writtenby Rita.
Future Perfect Active: Ritawill have writtena letter.
Passive: A letterwill have been writtenby Rita.
Conditional I Active: Ritawould writea letter.
Passive: A letterwould be writtenby Rita.
Conditional II Active: Ritawould have writtena letter.
Passive: A letterwould have been writtenby Rita.


For more explanation about to turn active sentence into passive clikc HERE.


WHAT SHALL I DO WHEN THE ACTIVE SENTENCE HAS TWO OBJECTS?

When there are two objects in an active sentence, there are two possible passive sentences.

E.G. The professor explained the exercise to the students.

There are two objects the example:
object 1 = indirect object: the students

object 2 = direct object: the exercise

An indirect object is very often a person, a direct object a thing. 

Each of the objects (direct and indirect) can be the subject in the passive sentence.
passive sentence - possibility 1
subject verb object (agent)
The students were explained the exercise. (by the professor).


passive sentence - possibility 2
subject verb object (agent)
The exercise to the students (by the professor).
Possibility 1 is sometimes called Personal passive and it is the most common used in passive voice.

CLICK ON THE EXERCISES BELOW TO PRACTISE PASSIVE VOICE